Why You Should Get FilmStruck (and the Criterion Channel)

“When people ask me if I went to film school I tell them, ‘no, I went to films.'”

-Quentin Tarantino

FilmStruck contains acclaimed films from unique filmmakers such as Yorgos Lanthimos, while The Criterion Channel hosts the iconic and classic films that shaped the medium of Film. Both channels also have video essays, commentaries, behind the scenes footage, and interviews with the cast and crew on many of their films.

When the Criterion Collection left Hulu I was heartbroken. It was the only reason I had Hulu. Netflix and Amazon are great, but they don’t traditionally have a lot of classic films to stream.

I remember trying to find an HD version of Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless and I stumbled upon FilmStruck. It was exactly what I was looking for and more!

I believe that you shouldn’t wait for inspiration. Inspiration is a fire that you must keep burning inside your soul. If you are a filmmaker, there is no better way to fuel that fire than by watching films by the masters of the medium.

I have had the service for over a month now, and I am thoroughly pleased. The continually refresh their library so you never run out of things to watch.

I would highly recommend this service to anyone who is interested in Film!

 

*This is not a sponsored post. I just really love the service!*

The Making of ‘Weeb’

The idea behind Weeb was to make “Kung Fu with a weeaboo,” but having the brain that I have, it became this video.

Production went pretty well, considering what we were making. It is often difficult to direct people in a project like this because of its over-the-top style. The hardest scene to explain was the opening. Luckily, Sean and I had gone to school together and even if he didn’t understand the purpose of the opening, he did trust me enough to know it would make sense in the edit.

Something I have discovered while doing these type of little projects is that you can’t always articulate your vision completely to everyone involved. What I mean by that is that you explain it differently to each person involved. To the DP it is how the image makes you feel, and to the actor it is how the character feels in the scene.

I played with the color in this video more than with previous projects because I wanted to to make the viewer feel like they were in a different world. Also, when I think of Anime, I think of vibrant colors both within the character’s dress and the background.

My Neighbor Totoro (1988) 

I wanted to add a sense of child-like wonder to the way that Sean’s character perceived the world, so I thought a super saturated achieved that.

Outtakes from the video:

 

The New Blacklist

“The blacklist was a time of evil…no one on either side who survived it came through untouched by evil…[Looking] back on this time…it will do no good to search for villains or heroes or saints or devils because there were none; there were only victims.”

-Dalton Trumbo

The Academy Awards have been viewed for many years as a sham by many people, but this year I feel insulted as a lover of cinema. I love Film, I hope by now that has been made clear, but I think Hollywood has out lived its usefulness.

I don’t think you should make a film to win awards. You should make a film because you have a story to tell. If you do win an award, it should be because you earned it. It shouldn’t matter who you are, what you look like, or what set of genitals you have.

Art is about appealing to the human soul. It transcends the flesh., crosses barriers, and brings us together. Art does not pander. 

Out of the 20+ films I saw in 2017,  it irritates me that Get Out is nominated for Best Picture, a genre film with forced social commentary over something like A Ghost Story, The Killing of a Sacred Deer, or even Blade Runner 2049 (though I didn’t care for it). Those films were something slightly different than the exciting, annual racism-is-bad romp that we are accustomed to seeing.

It is pretty obvious that Get Out was put there to meet some sort of of quota and that’s really sad. It shouldn’t matter who you are, it should matter what film you made. Enforcing this distorted “diversity” will turn the Academy Awards into the Not White Male Awards.

Isn’t this forced inclusion of “diverse” films simply shifting the prejudice to another group of people rather than giving more people exposure?

I find the idea of the censorship and maligning of the art of any artist based solely on what group they belong to alarming and disgusting. I firmly believe that everyone deserves a voice in art, even if popular opinion is that they have too much privilege. It has only been  50(ish) years since the infamous days of the Blacklist. Are we really going to repeat this petty political game this quickly?