The Joy of Caterpillars

One summer my mother had broken her foot and I was tasked with watering her tomatoes. I hauled the hose to the backyard and stood for what felt like hours pouring water on the plants. It was hot and humid and I just wanted it to be over. However, tiny visitors changed my perspective.

Tobacco Hornworm (Manduca sexta)

These charming little worms enraptured my attention. Luckily, my overindulgent parents let them live as long as I kept them away from the tomatoes.

Moth (Manduca sexta)

Ever since that moment I have been obsessed with these little guys. I have kept Wagner’s guide close and have sought out as many species as possible. Recently, I have been trying to culitvate more species of caterpillars by planting host plants.

Early instar of Spicebush Swallowtail (Papilio troilus)

The relationships between the caterpillars and their host plants are some of the most fascinating to study. The plants influence their developement to such an extreme degree that the life cycle insect cannot be separated from the plant.

Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)

These little worms are an indispensable part of the ecosystem. For example, 96% of terrestial birds rear their young on insects.  Breeding season for the birds conicides with the emrgences of caterpillars making them a primary food source for breeding pairs.

Caterpillars come in so many shapes, sizes, and colors that their beauty and interesting behavior is inexhaustible.

Monkey Slug (Phobetron pithecium)
Puss Caterpilllar (Megalopyge opercularis)
Saddled Prominent (Heterocampa guttivitta)

Nothing

You’re scared if something happens. You’re scared if something doesn’t. If you are going to be scared anyway you might as well do something.

Failure is still something.

Nothing is what you are scared of. That’s what you are going to get if keep procrastinating. Procrastinting isn’t quite what you’re doing, is it?

You’re running.

Nothing will catch up with you eventually unless you actually create something.



An Introduction to the ‘Korean New Wave’

Out of all the media I have consumed, nothing compares to the roller coaster of excitement that is seeing a new film out of Korea. After a turbulent 20th century (and even during the 20th century), the pennisula has produced some of the most celebrated films of recent memory.

My aim is to create a short guide that you might benefit from viewing first as you delve in to Korean Cinema. These films are often the most accessible foreign language films available and simply wonderful to watch.

The Good The Bad The Weird directed by Jee-woon Kim (2008)

Korean New Wave

Who doesn’t love a good Western? The Good the Bad the Weird is a Korean Western set in the 1930s in the former Japanese province of Mantruria. Two outlaws, a bounty hunter, and a whole host of others set out to posess a treasure map.

This film has got it all! Shoot outs, fight scenes, epic chases, Barbarians with hammers, you name it!

The Good the Bad the Weird succeeds in delivering a classic genre film in a truly unique way. It is funny, supenseful, and full of heart. I would recommend starting with this film first because it perfectly encapsulates what is so great about the Korean New Wave.

Train to Busan directed by Sang-ho Yeon (2016)

Korean New Wave

When is the last time you were actually emotionally invested in a Zombie movie? Wait no longer! Train to Busan is the story of a group a passengers survining the outbreak of the Zombie virus while stuck on a train from Seoul to Busan.

At its core, the film hangs on the relationship between the two leads, a father and young daughter. It keeps you emotionally involved throughout the entire film. It is very touching and saying more would ruin the film.

The zombie stuff is still awesome! It is the only film that I know of where you can watch someone puch Zombies to death!

Joint Security Area directed by Park Chanwook (2000)

Korean New Wave

Joint Security Area is the story of an investigation of a shootout in the DMZ between North and South Korea. Instead of uncovering malice and hatred, they uncover the tale of tragic friendship.

Joint Security Area is one of the best dramas I have ever seen. It is poignant and eternally relevant. The film is powerful and stays with you forever.

You can read more about my thoughts on it here.

Korean New Wave

I hope this will serve as a useful guide to start on your journey with Korean Film. There are still many wonderful films premiering every year, so don’t miss out on the fun of the Korean New Wave!

Thanks for reading!

If you like this article, please follow this blog and subscribe to my emailing list.